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frogmanslightschool:

Fog at Night
I took these after a friend’s birthday; the group I was with were heading to a club when I parted ways with them due to a migraine. I had a 40-minute walk to manage across downtown, and I had my camera. This is what came of it.
Neon and street lights do a lot of interesting stuff in the fog, especially if you play with your ISO settings and your aperture. 
Usually, if you’re shooting landscape, you want your aperture as small as possible. On your camera’s settings, this translates to a higher f-stop, e.g. f/16. You do this because it allows as much of the image to be in focus as possible. 
Of course, fog makes stuff out of focus regardless of your camera settings, so you can have fun with shots that should typically be on the higher f-stop. By using a lower one, less is in focus, but more light is let in. Combine that with the naturally reflective fog and you have some unique night shots. 
The same goes for a high ISO, but in reverse. There’s a lot more light bouncing around, and thus, a high ISO can peak much easier than on a clear light. 
All of that said, these images aren’t perfect. A close look will reveal a lot of noise in the so-called black areas. Fog is tricky, especially in regards to reading your settings. Even more so if you’re wincing when you check your screen since part of your brain wants out. 
Quick tips for shooting fog at night:
In my opinion, photography as “painting with light” is never more true than in this setting. Play with all sorts of different lights and settings!
Your aperture can do a lot of unique things in this setting. 
Settings are more reliable than fog in the day, but they can still lie. Your main concern is over- or under-exposing.
Photo by Bryce
You can find more of me here via these links: [website | tumblr | portfolio | twitter | wish list]
Zoom Info
frogmanslightschool:

Fog at Night
I took these after a friend’s birthday; the group I was with were heading to a club when I parted ways with them due to a migraine. I had a 40-minute walk to manage across downtown, and I had my camera. This is what came of it.
Neon and street lights do a lot of interesting stuff in the fog, especially if you play with your ISO settings and your aperture. 
Usually, if you’re shooting landscape, you want your aperture as small as possible. On your camera’s settings, this translates to a higher f-stop, e.g. f/16. You do this because it allows as much of the image to be in focus as possible. 
Of course, fog makes stuff out of focus regardless of your camera settings, so you can have fun with shots that should typically be on the higher f-stop. By using a lower one, less is in focus, but more light is let in. Combine that with the naturally reflective fog and you have some unique night shots. 
The same goes for a high ISO, but in reverse. There’s a lot more light bouncing around, and thus, a high ISO can peak much easier than on a clear light. 
All of that said, these images aren’t perfect. A close look will reveal a lot of noise in the so-called black areas. Fog is tricky, especially in regards to reading your settings. Even more so if you’re wincing when you check your screen since part of your brain wants out. 
Quick tips for shooting fog at night:
In my opinion, photography as “painting with light” is never more true than in this setting. Play with all sorts of different lights and settings!
Your aperture can do a lot of unique things in this setting. 
Settings are more reliable than fog in the day, but they can still lie. Your main concern is over- or under-exposing.
Photo by Bryce
You can find more of me here via these links: [website | tumblr | portfolio | twitter | wish list]
Zoom Info
frogmanslightschool:

Fog at Night
I took these after a friend’s birthday; the group I was with were heading to a club when I parted ways with them due to a migraine. I had a 40-minute walk to manage across downtown, and I had my camera. This is what came of it.
Neon and street lights do a lot of interesting stuff in the fog, especially if you play with your ISO settings and your aperture. 
Usually, if you’re shooting landscape, you want your aperture as small as possible. On your camera’s settings, this translates to a higher f-stop, e.g. f/16. You do this because it allows as much of the image to be in focus as possible. 
Of course, fog makes stuff out of focus regardless of your camera settings, so you can have fun with shots that should typically be on the higher f-stop. By using a lower one, less is in focus, but more light is let in. Combine that with the naturally reflective fog and you have some unique night shots. 
The same goes for a high ISO, but in reverse. There’s a lot more light bouncing around, and thus, a high ISO can peak much easier than on a clear light. 
All of that said, these images aren’t perfect. A close look will reveal a lot of noise in the so-called black areas. Fog is tricky, especially in regards to reading your settings. Even more so if you’re wincing when you check your screen since part of your brain wants out. 
Quick tips for shooting fog at night:
In my opinion, photography as “painting with light” is never more true than in this setting. Play with all sorts of different lights and settings!
Your aperture can do a lot of unique things in this setting. 
Settings are more reliable than fog in the day, but they can still lie. Your main concern is over- or under-exposing.
Photo by Bryce
You can find more of me here via these links: [website | tumblr | portfolio | twitter | wish list]
Zoom Info
frogmanslightschool:

Fog at Night
I took these after a friend’s birthday; the group I was with were heading to a club when I parted ways with them due to a migraine. I had a 40-minute walk to manage across downtown, and I had my camera. This is what came of it.
Neon and street lights do a lot of interesting stuff in the fog, especially if you play with your ISO settings and your aperture. 
Usually, if you’re shooting landscape, you want your aperture as small as possible. On your camera’s settings, this translates to a higher f-stop, e.g. f/16. You do this because it allows as much of the image to be in focus as possible. 
Of course, fog makes stuff out of focus regardless of your camera settings, so you can have fun with shots that should typically be on the higher f-stop. By using a lower one, less is in focus, but more light is let in. Combine that with the naturally reflective fog and you have some unique night shots. 
The same goes for a high ISO, but in reverse. There’s a lot more light bouncing around, and thus, a high ISO can peak much easier than on a clear light. 
All of that said, these images aren’t perfect. A close look will reveal a lot of noise in the so-called black areas. Fog is tricky, especially in regards to reading your settings. Even more so if you’re wincing when you check your screen since part of your brain wants out. 
Quick tips for shooting fog at night:
In my opinion, photography as “painting with light” is never more true than in this setting. Play with all sorts of different lights and settings!
Your aperture can do a lot of unique things in this setting. 
Settings are more reliable than fog in the day, but they can still lie. Your main concern is over- or under-exposing.
Photo by Bryce
You can find more of me here via these links: [website | tumblr | portfolio | twitter | wish list]
Zoom Info

frogmanslightschool:

Fog at Night

I took these after a friend’s birthday; the group I was with were heading to a club when I parted ways with them due to a migraine. I had a 40-minute walk to manage across downtown, and I had my camera. This is what came of it.

Neon and street lights do a lot of interesting stuff in the fog, especially if you play with your ISO settings and your aperture. 

Usually, if you’re shooting landscape, you want your aperture as small as possible. On your camera’s settings, this translates to a higher f-stop, e.g. f/16. You do this because it allows as much of the image to be in focus as possible. 

Of course, fog makes stuff out of focus regardless of your camera settings, so you can have fun with shots that should typically be on the higher f-stop. By using a lower one, less is in focus, but more light is let in. Combine that with the naturally reflective fog and you have some unique night shots. 

The same goes for a high ISO, but in reverse. There’s a lot more light bouncing around, and thus, a high ISO can peak much easier than on a clear light. 

All of that said, these images aren’t perfect. A close look will reveal a lot of noise in the so-called black areas. Fog is tricky, especially in regards to reading your settings. Even more so if you’re wincing when you check your screen since part of your brain wants out. 

Quick tips for shooting fog at night:

  • In my opinion, photography as “painting with light” is never more true than in this setting. Play with all sorts of different lights and settings!
  • Your aperture can do a lot of unique things in this setting. 
  • Settings are more reliable than fog in the day, but they can still lie. Your main concern is over- or under-exposing.

Photo by Bryce

You can find more of me here via these links: [website | tumblr | portfolio | twitter | wish list]

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